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If You Are The CEO of A Big Company, Know What Your Customer Service is Doing

If You Are The CEO of A Big Company, Know What Your Customer Service is Doing

Did you all have the experience when you called the customer service and then the response was not all that fantastic? As Internet entrepreneurs, this kind of experiences drive us more to want to provide better customer service to our clients and potential customers.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been greeted with great customer service from small medium enterprises and online startups. They understand that in order to get the business from potential clients and retain existing ones, customer service is the KEY, on top of delivering a kick-ass product that solves people’s problems or needs. So big companies, if your customer service is still less-than-average, you need to do something about it. Don’t become a joke!

It’s funny today I had a conversation with Derek Gehl and he told be about something that didn’t quite work on their backend for a large company – Google. And I had a similar experience just today with another company – Paypal.

Derek had his Youtube account linked to his Google+ profile and he wanted to make the switch so that the account is linked to his Google+ page instead. Google had a great support form online allowing you to submit request to make the switch. Later that day, he received an email from Google telling him that he needs to wait because the system that does that is currently broken. What!?!

It’s all good really, since stuff do break from time to time. While we are joking about this…it brings me to an important point:

If a customer or user had a bad experience with the company before, any other trivial matters will trigger the past unhappiness almost instantaneously. A small matter that you would usually brush away would be magnified 10 times in this situation.

In Derek’s case, he had a really bad experience with Google previously. The customer service is obviously clueless and is applying the standard response to Derek. Which is annoying!

Today, I received an email from what looks like a legit email from Paypal, informing me that my there was a payment reversal and my account is restricted until I resolved the issue.

Here’s a snapshot of the email on my Samsung S4:

2015-01-30 07.20.24

On all accounts, it does look like Paypal sent me this email from service@intl.paypal.com. However, when I looked at the same email from my web browser, things are different.

paypai screenshot
Screenshot from web browser

 

Did you notice that the email was in fact sent from a spam address service@inti.paypai.com? On systems that uses the san serif font, the capital “i” would look exactly like a small letter “l”. So that was what happens on my Samsung S4, it looked like Paypal when it was really Paypai. If anyone had clicked on the link provided in the email, and typed in their account username and password, the spammer would have received his/her login and will be able to take money from that account.

Usually, I would ignore spam emails, but given that this email could potentially tricked the unaware, I thought I should report this to Paypal and have them take actions. On their site, they have a page telling you how to report fake emails. All you have to do is simply forward the entire email to spoof@paypal.com.

I tried emailing them and my mail server reported an error:

mail error

 

WTF? It didn’t work. So how do people report spams if the email address didn’t work?

I was pretty sure I didn’t key in as “spoof@paypai.com” though. Regardless, I tried a second time by copying the link right from the site. Same error.

I was determined, so I wrote to Paypal on their Contact Form and told them that their email was broken. Hopefully, someone on the other end reads it and then go fix the issue.

But this was the response I got. The whole chunk of it, telling me again how to identify if an email is from Paypal and report to “spoof@paypal.com” if I suspected that I received one. OMG!

 

Email responses from Paypal
Email responses from Paypal

 

Paypal, quit using automated response. It makes you look silly!

Never mind that. I guess I’ll just have to post on my blog to warn people about this spam email. Keep an eye on such emails if you have a Paypal account. Never click on the links provided from the source if you do not trust it, or links that supposedly bring you to your Internet banking, financial or Paypal accounts. Always manually type in the url on your browser to get there.

Obviously, you don’t have to be the CEO to be the one doing quality controls on your customer service department. If keeping customer happy is one of your company goals, make sure someone qualified is overseeing the customer service department. It’s something that a lot of large companies forget to pay attention to.

Customer service officers are the front-liners, they can make or break your company’s reputation. If neglected, one day, your customer service will make your company look silly.

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